BULLETIN
of Udmurt University
Sociology. Political Science. International Relations
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Article


Year
2018
Issue
1
Pages
103-109
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Section СОЦИОЛОГИЯ. ПОЛИТОЛОГИЯ. МЕЖДУНАРОДНЫЕ ОТНОШЕНИЯ
Title LIBERALISM AND FUNCTIONING OF THE MODERN NATIONAL STATE FROM THE POSITION OF WORLD-SYSTEM ANALYSIS
Author(-s) Chernyshev Maxim V.
Abstract From the period of the French revolution, which linked the Rights of man with the demand for national sovereignty, liberal cosmopolitan theories paradoxically appealed to the ideology of nationalism. In his analysis of the paradigm of modernity Immanuel Wallerstein emphasised two opposite connotations in the framework of this concept - modernity of liberation and modernity of technology. The interrelationship between them became the issue of numerous intellectual discussions regarding the role of liberal theory in formation and functioning of the modern capitalist state. In this essay the author argues that practical implementation of liberal doctrine highly depends on specific socioeconomic context in certain world regions and development of the world-system. Considering different starting points in formation of the modern state in northwest Europe, the interests of local groups of elites articulated differently there comparing to semi-peripheral and peripheral world areas, one should admit that no single trend in applicability of liberal ideas to political reality could emerge. Therefore, the ideology of liberalism led to justification of the mechanisms for both conservation and undermining of the existing social order.
Keywords Liberalism, Modernity, Western civilisation, World-system analysis, Immanuel Wallerstein
UDC 316.2
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